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DISCOVER GREAT BUSINESS PLAN TIPS

BUSINESS PLAN TIPS

“Learn the business plan tips that will make your forensic engineering practice outstanding.”

By John D. Gaskell, Retired Consulting Engineer

Author of “The Complete Guide to FORENSIC ENGINEERING

Forensic engineering is defined by the National Academy of Forensic Engineers (NAFE) as “the application of the art and science of engineering in matters which are in, or may possibly relate to, the jurisprudence system, inclusive of alternative dispute resolution.” These engineers serve as consultants to the legal profession and as expert witnesses in courts of law.

INTRODUCTION

Understand what a Business Plan includes, how you can build one, and how important it will be to the success of your engineering practice. Discover how your business plan defines your company and its goals, gives you a game plan, and helps you make a go/no go/or wait decision. Find out why updating your business plan both monthly and annually allows you to adjust expectations and/or modify actions to compensate. Ascertain how the selection of your company name affects both how it identifies you and the future salability of your practice. Observe that your business plan will be the “key tool” in seeking financing and a line of credit, both for start-up and for cash flow needs. Get Jack’s new book: The “Complete Guide” to FORENSIC ENGINEERING to learn the details of preparing a business plan.

TIPS

  • Be careful and realistic. A “Business Plan” is one of the most important and frequently overlooked steps in the process of starting a forensic engineering practice.
  • Make it your “game plan.” Your Business Plan defines your company and its goals, helps you (and your spouse/partners) make a “go/no go/or wait” decision, and aids in forecasting financial needs and securing financing.
  • Look at your Business Plan both monthly and annually. Compare projections to actual and adjust expectations accordingly or modify actions to compensate.
  • Company Name. Carefully choose your company name considering both how it identifies you and the future salability of your practice.
  • “Key Tool.” Your Business Plan will be critically important in seeking financial support, financing, and a line of credit for start-up and cash flow needs.

Litigation consulting is interesting, challenging, and profitable. If what is involved interests you, I recommend adding “Forensic Engineering” to your practice as a consulting engineer. Learn the business plan tips that will make your forensic engineering practice outstanding.

Get Jack’s new book: The “Complete Guide” to FORENSIC ENGINEERING to learn the details. Also, the largest chapter in his book: The “Complete Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING covers the “highlights” of Forensic Engineering. Visit TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Learn how to be a forensic engineer. Learn how to be a forensic expert witness. How to be an engineering expert witness. How to obtain training as a forensic engineer. How to obtain training as an engineering expert witness. Learn the business plan tips that will make your forensic engineering practice outstanding.