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BECOME EXCEPTIONAL

https://www.theengineersresource.com/become-exceptional/

Become exceptional! Learn everything that you can about your profession or business so that you stand head-and-shoulders above your competition. If your services or products are just “mediocre”, all the marketing efforts in the world are unlikely to lead to your success.

Start the job right

Once you have a job, do your best to become exceptional. Arrive early and leave late.

Start a notebook to record information, such as how to do each part of your new position, formulas, code rules, contacts, and anything that you might need again. My notebook was a three-ring binder; yours will be your computer or iPad.

Ask a lot of questions, but avoid the same question a second time—be exceptional – consult your notebook.

I soon learned that my mentor, Mr. King, could never answer a question with a yes or a no. His answers always came with a story and a long explanation. This was often frustrating when we were up against a deadline. But it taught me related things, helped me to remember the answers, and gave me an understanding of the why. Fill your notebook with knowledge and become exceptional.

Stay up to date

It’s critically important that you stay up to date. This involves weekly reading, including magazines in your industry and in your specialty, code updates and interpretations, business trends, and current affairs. This will aid you in your present job and help your future endeavors to thrive and prosper in any economy. Dedicate at least four hours a week to this task. Always have something with you to read. Don’t waste time waiting for doctors while reading outdated health-care magazines.

“White Papers”

Start writing and memorizing “white papers”. A white paper is a report or guide to help readers to understand an issue. It is one thing to understand an issue. But, If you can explain it in laymen’s terms, clearly and distinctly, your listener may think that you are the “smartest person in the room”.

My new book

I have recently completed a book on Marketing: “The ‘Smart Guide’ to MARKETING”, that is presently on sale at the Kindle Store on Amazon. Both the paperback & hardback (Case Laminated) versions are available from my website: https://www.TheEngineersResource.com.
To see my YouTube video of: “Your Disaster Recovery Plan” go to: Jack’s YouTube Channel.
To see my YouTube video of: “Career Choice” go to: CHOICE https://youtu.be/Rkh0SHfZ9Ew

Related topics include:

How to Prepare for a Job Interview – Interview.

How to easily and quickly get the interviews that you want.
How to prepare for your interview and be ready for the likely questions.
How to start the job right and make the best first impression.
How to become known, build a reputation and make useful contacts.
How to gain credentials that will distinguish you from your competitors.
How to win awards that will make your resume shine.

Excerpted from ‘The “Smart Guide” to MARKETING’ Copyright © 2020 by Jack Gaskell. All rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to copy and distribute this “Smart Guide” tip, upon condition that this message remains. Visit: My WEBSITE for additional tips.
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“Starting Your Career” CHECK LIST

https://www.theengineersresource.com/become-exceptional/

 

Follow the Starting Your Career check list. Other than a marriage choice, choosing a career is your most important life choice. 

  • Plan ahead: Don’t stumble into your career. Plan for it. Take the courses in high school – like college prep, if that is the career path that will lead you to the profession/business that is right for you.
  • Your career choice: Should be lucrative enough to support you and a family, not restrict where you can live, and not require odd hours or excessive travel.
  • Shadow: Spend a day with someone in the field that interests you. If your goal is to be an engineer spend a day with a specialist in each of your top choices: i.e. electrical, mechanical, structural, civil etc.
  • Is owning a business right for you? Evaluate a list of advantages and disadvantages.
    • Advantages: Making all the final decisions; never being laid-off; keeping all the profits; and being able to sell an asset upon retirement.

 

To see the full presentation watch Jack Gaskell’s video CHOICE.

 

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HOW TO BECOME KNOWN

https://www.theengineersresource.com/become-exceptional/

My Start

I’m an electrical engineer and a graduate of the College of Engineering at the University of Rhode Island. With this one statement, you’re likely thinking that I must be really smart. That’s one of the reasons you should get the best education that’s within your means. The first step is to become known.

Some of my classmates never studied and got all As and Bs. (I still hate those guys.) I studied day and night and seldom got a grade above a C. and I graduated in the bottom half of my class. However, I was savvy, and I knew how to market myself and my professional practice, and within ten years, many people thought that I was “the smartest person in the room” (You are what you are thought to be) and also that my engineering practice therefore must be the best. If you pursue my advice, you can also gain that regard.

I was a nobody; I came from a blue-collar family and had never even seen the inside of a country club. But I was savvy enough to realize that I needed to start building an outstanding reputation and gain more credentials.

Meet People in your Profession/Industry

As soon as you graduate, start attending meetings of local organizations in your field of interest. Even if you don’t have a job yet, it will give you an opportunity to meet people in your industry and become known. These contacts might help you get a job or help you in other ways.

Here you’ll meet the players in your profession/industry, people who will be your colleagues, future competitors, or future employees. In most cases, you don’t even need to join to attend meetings. Try to get on the local mailing list so that you’ll be notified of meetings. Now most organizations have websites were meeting notices are posted. Most are usually evening dinner meetings with a guest speaker.

As a newly graduated engineer, I joined several organizations and attended meetings of the following:

The Rhode Island Society of Professional Engineers (RISPE)

Providence Engineering Society (PES)

Electrical League of Rhode Island(ELRI)

Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES)

Rhode Islanders initially had to drive fifty miles to attend meetings of the Boston IES chapter. But we had local meetings after a group of us formed the RI chapter of the IES, of which, I’m proud to say, I was the founding president. (Since I was only twenty-nine and new in the business, I was very pleased that my colleagues chose me as the first president. It was not until years later that I learned that they had previously been turned down by all my more experienced competitors.)

At meetings, collect business cards from those that you want to get to know. Start making a contact list, including both business and personal information. You’ll form a quicker and closer friendship if you can remember that he or she has an interest in baseball and has a three-year-old daughter named Michelle.

Gain Credentials

Initially, my resume included membership in the above-listed organizations. My next goal was to become a board member of RISPE. I asked the local president if there were any committee openings; there are always openings. I chose to become publications committee chairman, which qualified me to attend monthly board meetings, meet the leaders, and be seen and known. Soon, I met the nominating committee chairmen. After our friendship was cemented, I expressed interest in being on the board, and I became Treasurer the following year (most nominees run unopposed). That put me on the ladder, and I became RISPE president in four years. After my presidency, I nominated one of the recent past presidents for the Engineer of the Year award; not surprisingly, in a few years, he nominated me.

I don’t mean to imply that all this was easy; it took a lot of hard work. But, with determination and effort, you can establish credentials that will eventually distinguish you from your competitors. The important lesson here is that it doesn’t just happen—you make it happen.

Jack’s new book

I have recently completed a book on Marketing: “The ‘Smart Guide’ to MARKETING”, that is presently on “Pre-Sale” at the Kindle Store on Amazon, and is due for release on June first. Both the paperback & hardback (Case Laminated) versions are available from my website:

To see my YouTube video of:

“Your Disaster Recovery Plan” go to: Jack’s YouTube Channel.

Related topics include:

How to Prepare for a Job Interview – at Jack’s website

How to Prepare for a Job Interview – at experisjobs.

How to easily and quickly get the interviews that you want.

How to prepare for your interview and be ready for the likely questions.

How to start the job right and make the best first impression.

How to become known, build a reputation and make useful contacts.

How to gain credentials that will distinguish you from your competitors.

How to win awards that will make your resume shine.

Excerpted from ‘The “Smart Guide” to MARKETING’ Copyright © 2020 by Jack Gaskell. All rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to copy and distribute this “Smart Guide” tip, upon condition that this message remains. Visit: My WEBSITE for additional tips.

 

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“Your Disaster Recovery Plan”

https://www.theengineersresource.com/your-disaster-recovery-plan/

 

Introduction to “disaster recovery”

Not many of us could have predicted the recent pandemic, and fewer of us have prepared a plan for our business to recover from it. We also need a business plan to recover from other kinds of business disasters, like fires or floods of our places of business. Some of us need to plan for natural disasters like hurricanes, blizzards, tornados, wildfires, avalanches, droughts, volcanos, or even tsunamis. Prepare your disaster recovery plan today.

My Book

I am the author of the book: ‘The “Smart Guide” to MARKETING’.  I recently finishing a new chapter: “Your Disaster Recovery Plan”. I suggest that readers use this chapter as a guide in preparing ‘Their Disaster Recovery Plan’ for their specific business. It will be a lot easier to leisurely develop it now rather than when their pants are on fire or they are standing in six inches of water.

The document that you create is “Your Disaster Recovery Plan,” so you need to decide what’s best for your company. Just highlight the items that you like in my new chapter and then create a separate list of your ideas.

To make creating a plan easier for others, I will provide a PDF of this chapter, available for download at a nominal price from my website: https://www.TheEngineersResource.com/shop.

Summary

The following is a summary of my advice:

  • Budget and prepare for adequate emergency funding
  • Prepare “Your Emergency Contact Lists” now
  • Pre-recovery “thanks and reassurance” to staff
  • Keep staff informed and updated
  • Protect property from further damage (if appropriate)
  • Protect property from looting (if needed)
  • Investigate your insurance coverage
  • Repair property (if needed)
  • Safeguard business records
  • Notify, reassure, and continually update clients/customers
  • Temporarily expand business online
  • Search for and move to temporary space (if needed)
  • Promote temporary reopening
  • Promote permanent reopening
  • Thank staff, workers, and customers for their efforts/understanding.

When a disaster happens, most people’s first thought is, What do I do now? But if you plan ahead, you’ll have “Your Disaster Recover Plan”. Create yours now!

YouTube Video

 To see my YouTube video of this presentation go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39Vrn8zb7fI

I have recently completed a book on Marketing: “The ‘Smart Guide’ to MARKETING”, that is presently on “Pre-Sale” at the Kindle Store on Amazon, and is due for release on June first.

Related topics include:

“How to Prepare for a Job Interview” – https://www.experisjobs.us/exp_us/en/career-advice/20-tips-job-interviews.htm

How to easily and quickly get the interviews that you want.

How to prepare for your interview and be ready for the likely questions.

How to start the job right and make the best first impression.

How to become known, build a reputation and make useful contacts.

How to gain credentials that will distinguish you from your competitors.

How to win awards that will make your resume shine.

Excerpt

Excerpted from ‘The “Smart Guide” to MARKETING’ Copyright © 2020 by Jack Gaskell. All rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to copy and distribute this “Smart Guide” tip, upon condition that this message remains. Visit: https://www.TheEngineersResource.com, for additional tips.

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YOUR JOB INTERVIEW

https://www.theengineersresource.com/your-disaster-recovery-plan/

YOUR JOB INTERVIEW

 

Graduates need to get the right experience and the first steps are obtaining your job interview and being properly prepared to impress.

Once you’re a graduate in your chosen field, the first step is to get a job that will give you exceptional experience and to qualify you to eventually take a licensure exam, if required and to make you outstanding. The key is the job interview.

The Job Search

Depending on the job market at the time of your graduation, getting a job interview might not be easy. You may not have a wide range of job choices. But if you get a job unrelated to your goals, it’s unlikely to lead to the success that you desire. You may have to consider commuting to a larger city to find work in your field.

First, prepare a resume, which, at this point, will only include your education and your summer job, if it involved your chosen career. But your summer job as a lifeguard won’t impress a prospective employer. Include praiseworthy accomplishments, like being an Eagle Scout. Mention interests concerning your career, but certainly don’t state an interest in eventually opening your own competing firm/business.

Make a list of related businesses in your area. Try to find a website for each to learn a little about them.  Next, print your resume on nice paper and deliver it to each business on your list. Don’t mail it.

Dress for success. Men should wear a suit or sport coat and tie. Women should wear a sweater and black dress pants or a blazer and skirt. A suit and bow tie worked best for me. Explain that you’re a recent (specialty) graduate and would like to speak with the manager/president/chief engineer (whatever applies in your case). If they ask why, reply, “I’m seeking advice and will only take a few minutes.” If they say he or she is busy, reply, “That’s ok, I can wait.”

If all else fails, ask the receptionist to present a copy of your resume and ask for the person’s business card. If it’s a good-size company, provide a second copy of your resume for the personnel department. If you don’t hear back within a week, call the person to verify that he received your resume and to inquire about job openings. Prepare a list of questions and have a copy ready for each call with spaces for the answers:

Q & A

Did you receive my resume?

Are there any entry level openings?

Are any openings likely in the near future? If so, when?

Can you recommend competitors who might be hiring?

          Do you have any advice for a young person just starting out?

Can I come in to your office and observe a typical day? (An eight-hour job interview.)

Send a letter or email thanking them for taking your call and for the advice. (Include another copy of your resume.)

If you don’t quickly get a job, stop back to see the same people. Their needs can change in just a few weeks. Consider bringing a box of chocolates, pastries or flowers for the receptionist who said that the person that you wanted to see was too busy to see you.

The Interview

Be prepared.

If you’re responding to an employment posting, make a list of the skills desired so that you’re prepared to discuss and relate them to your training and education. Don’t be concerned if you don’t have all the qualifications listed. There may be an entry-level position available.

Make a list of five skills and qualifications of yours that you can share during the interview.

Go to the company’s website to learn more about the company so that you’ll be better prepared for questions, like “What interests you about our company?”

Make a list of likely questions that you may be asked and prepare answers: Why should I hire you? Is there anything about the job or the company that I haven’t told you? What are your career goals in the next five years, and how will you achieve them? What are your salary requirements?

Make a list of questions about the job and the company, and bring up your questions if the interviewer doesn’t offer the information.

Ask if you can meet someone in a similar position and the person who will be your immediate supervisor.

Ask about the skills that you’ll be learning and applying in the available position, and access their relevance to your future goals. For example, assume that you’re an electrical engineer and wish to open a practice designing electrical systems for buildings. A position as a lighting designer won’t teach you the diversity of other skills needed.

Try not to look like a deer in the headlights; practice in front of a mirror. Listen carefully and don’t be afraid to take notes during the interview. Bring extra copies of your resume, including a list of references. Also, bring your list of questions, a pad (in a folio), and a pen. Don’t bring a drink or chew gum, and turn your cell phone off.

Send the interviewer a thank-you note or email.

You may have to widen your job-search area, but with persistence, you’ll eventually get a job in your chosen field.

To find out more go to: https://www.thebalancecareers.com/how-to-prepare-for-a-job-interview-2061361

Start the Job Right

Once you have a job, do your best to be exceptional. Arrive early and leave late. Start a notebook to record information, such as formulas, code rules, contacts, and anything that you might need again. My notebook was a three-ring binder; yours will be your computer or iPad.

Start Your Notebook

Ask a lot of questions, but avoid the same question a second time—consult your notebook.

I soon learned that my mentor, Mr. King could never answer a question with a yes or a no. His answers always came with a story and a long explanation. This was often frustrating when we were up against a deadline. But it taught me related things, helped me to remember the answers, and gave me an understanding of the why.

Fill your notebook with knowledge.

It’s critically important that you stay up to date. This involves weekly reading, including magazines in your industry and in your specialty, code updates and interpretations, business trends, and current affairs. This will aid you in your present job and help your future endeavors to thrive and prosper in any economy. Dedicate at least four hours a week to this task. Always have something with you to read. Don’t waste time waiting for doctors while reading outdated health-care magazines.

Start White Papers

Start writing white papers. A white paper is a report or guide to help readers to understand an issue. When your work involves a new technical issue, read about it and take detailed notes in narrative form, including definitions of the various new terms.

Organize your notes and add this white paper to your notebook. Start as soon as you have a job. After you have prepared a white paper, reread it several times, and commit much of the information to memory. When the subject comes up, you’ll be able to discuss it like an expert and before long everyone will consider you the smartest person in the room. White papers will serve as a useful future reference and possibly the basis of a magazine article authored by you.

I have recently completed a book on Marketing: “The ‘Smart Guide’ to MARKETING”, that is presently on “Pre-Sale” at the Kindle Store on Amazon, and is due for release on June first.

Related topics include:

“How to Prepare for a Job Interview” – https://www.experisjobs.us/exp_us/en/career-advice/20-tips-job-interviews.htm

How to easily and quickly get the interviews that you want.

How to prepare for your interview and be ready for the likely questions.

How to start the job right and make the best first impression.

How to become known, build a reputation and make useful contacts.

How to gain credentials that will distinguish you from your competitors.

How to win awards that will make your resume shine.

Excerpted from ‘The “Smart Guide” to MARKETING’ Copyright © 2020 by Jack Gaskell. All rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to copy and distribute this “Smart Guide” tip, upon condition that this message remains. Visit: https://www.TheEngineersResource.com, for additional tips.

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MAKING A CAREER CHOICE

career choice

MAKING A CAREER CHOICE

By: Jack Gaskell – Author of ‘The “Smart Guide” to MARKETING’.

Your student is probably mindlessly playing video games, is bored and looking for something constructive to do. (or so you hope.) Now is the time for them to plan their future.

At the high school level, students should consider career options. Don’t choose a career just because it sounds like fun. Make sure that it will be lucrative enough to support you and a family, won’t restrict where you can live, and won’t require odd hours or excessive travel. I have a friend whose daughter became a marine biologist and later found out that it qualified her to shovel seal poop.

Shadowing

Before spending four years of your life and your parents’ hard-earned money, you should be reasonably sure that your chosen options are right for you. I recommend “shadowing” somebody in the fields that interest you. If you don’t know someone, use the internet. Make a phone call and explain that you’re a high school student interested in becoming an _________ and would like to speak to an _________. Explain to the _________ that you would like to come to his or her office and observe a typical day. Very few people would turn down that kind of request, and it might turn into a summer internship or a job after graduation. If you’re unsure of your specific career choice, call __________ of various specialties to try and gain an understanding of what their jobs entail. Spending time with several __________ would broaden your perceptive.

 

Don’t “Stumble” into a career

In my case, my father was an electrician. I helped him with side jobs and grew up with an interest in electricity. I chose to take an academic vocational course in high school, radio, television, and industrial electronics, with the goal of becoming a TV repair person. (Do you know anyone, today who’s making a living repairing TVs?)

In my senior year of high school, two of my classmates decided to go to Wentworth Institute in Boston, Massachusetts, for associate’s degrees in electrical engineering; so I applied and was accepted. When my two years at Wentworth were almost complete, a friend in my class told me that he was going to a four-year college for a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering while getting almost two years of credit for his associate’s degree. So I applied at the University of Rhode Island and was accepted—but with no credits for the two years at Wentworth. However, low in-state tuition and the ability to commute from home made this the only realistic option for me.

Instead of stumbling your way through six years to become an __________, plan ahead and do it in four years. In high school, take a college prep course that’s strong in the subjects related to your area of interest.

When selecting a college, make sure that it’s accredited in your area of specialty.

When making a career choice consider both pros and cons.

Make a List of Benefits and Drawbacks

your interests/lack of interest

your skills/lack of the required skills

challenging/easy

varied/repetitive

lucrative/adequate/inadequate

free time/busy schedule

cyclical industry/steady demand

time spent inside/outside/both

travel opportunities/too much travel/no travel requirements

offers opportunity to own a business/not

require immediate actions/allows time for thoughtful decisions

low stress/high stress

high demand/low demand

puts you in an adversarial position/not adversarial

deadline pressure/leisurely pace

profitably pressure/nonprofit

periods of too little or too much work/steady work

limits where you can live/no limit

high cost and time for education and internship/low cost and time

Evaluate your entrepreneurial nature/motivation.

 

Do You Want to Own a Business?

 

Advantages

You have a much higher earning potential.

You have pride of ownership.

You get the benefits of being the boss.

You get to make all the final decisions.

You can’t get laid-off.

You get to keep the profits.

You can pick and choose the most appealing tasks to personally handle and assign the others to your staff.

You can pursue the most interesting and profitable projects/products/clients.

You spend time socializing with clients and potential clients.

If you’re successful and hire an able staff, you’ll have a valuable asset to sell when it comes time for your retirement.

 

Disadvantages

Stress—There’s always stress when owning a business. Some people thrive on it; others wilt. You need to decide if the benefits/advantages outweigh the drawbacks/disadvantages.

Be prepared to make sacrifices. When I was new in business as a consulting engineer and still operating alone, work slowed down, and my wife and I decided to take a quick driving vacation to Canada. At the last minute, I got a call from my biggest client announcing that he had just promised a client of his to provide a redesign that had to be delivered in one week. It was no fun having to go out to the car to break the bad news to my wife and two small children.

You make the firing decisions. This is particularly hard during the holiday season.

The losses are all yours. On average, I made at least three times more compensation than my fellow engineering classmates, but during one recession, I lost more than my salary for three years in a row.

Employees. The biggest headache in running any business is managing human resources. Often, employees don’t get along with each other or with the clients, and sometimes, they don’t even care about the success of the company that employs them. Regardless, before you know it, you may be responsible for thirty or more mouths to feed. That is an awesome and burdensome responsibility.

 

Making a Choice

Other than a marriage choice, choosing a career is your most important life choice. If you’re still undecided, I recommend that you go to the website: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/. This is the Occupational Outlook Handbook by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.  It has a wealth of information regarding career choices. First, select an occupational group that interests you. Then, see a list of occupations in that group including job descriptions, entry-level educational requirements, as well as recent median pay levels. Next select a career choice and see details.

 

My Recommendation

Only you can make this important life decision. But I recommend the following if you have the interest and skills:

  • Choose to be a professional: doctor, lawyer, engineer, architect, accountant, and the like. When people learn that you’re a professional, they immediately assume that you’re smart. You may have never gotten any grade higher than a C; you may have graduated last in your graduating class; and you may have had to take your licensure exam four times before passing. But you’re perceived to be smart because you’re a professional, and potential clients will tend to choose your practice or business
  • Choose a profession that will allow you to operate your own business. If you operate your own business, you’ll have all the advantages described above.

I have recently completed a book on Marketing: “The ‘Smart Guide’ to MARKETING”, that is presently on “Pre-Sale” at the Kindle Store on Amazon, and is due for release on June first.

Related topics include:

Your job search and how to find the right company with which to start.

How to easily and quickly get the interviews that you want.

How to prepare for your interview and be ready for the likely questions.

How to start the job right and make the best first impression.

How to become known, build a reputation and make useful contacts.

How to gain credentials that will distinguish you from your competitors.

How to win awards that will make your resume shine.

Excerpted from ‘The “Smart Guide” to MARKETING’ Copyright © 2020 by Jack Gaskell. All rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to copy and distribute this “Smart Guide” tip, upon condition that this message remains. Visit: https://www.TheEngineersResource.com, for additional tips.

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007’s New Montra

I believe that we will soon be seeing a lot of “Bumper Stickers” with the following sentiment:

                                    Thank God for “The Donald”

It would make a great – “ Brighter outlook” –  news story for the new month.

Your Marketing Methods List

This coronavirus pandemic that we are currently experiancing worldwide is probably the most dramatic event any of us will experience in our lifetimes.

This event will impact all of us perminently and it will impact each of us in different ways.

Our common impacts include:

The loss of somone we know and in most cases the loss of a friend or loved-on.

The fear of closeness to others