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BEST MARKETING TIP LIST

MARKETING TIP LIST

By: John D. Gaskell, author of:

           How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room.

You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to become a “MARKETING” genius.

MARKETING TIP LIST (Part 7 of a multi-part article)

  • Project a “smart” and professional image by your dress and confident appearance.
  • Dress for success. Men should wear a suit or sport coat and tie. A suite and bow tie worked best for me. Women should wear a sweater and black dress pants or a blazer and skirt.
  • Look people in the eye and always have a smile on your face.
  • Make your Business Announcement outstanding. It should look like a wedding invitation on fine, thick paper with raised letters.
  • Create elegant Letterhead & Business Cards. Parchment with raised letters and no logo would be a good choice.
  • Your Brochure is the face of the company. It will evolve as your firm grows. Try to make it versatile and something that will make you proud and distinguish you from your competitors.
  • Your Mailing List is your most important promotional tool. Expand it to include those who may recommend you. Send all mailings to the entire list. Send a minimum of two per year including: up-dates, announcements and holiday cards.
  • Create the lists & forms: These should match your firm needs, including an expanded contact list.
  • Don’t overlook Promotional Items. Consider personalized note paper, post cards, pens, and anniversary stickers.
  • Write and publish technical articles. Send reprints to your mailing list and include them with your brochure. Everyone will consider you to be an “expert” in your field.
  • Make news Announcements. Don’t forget to send out announcements of awards; new services/specialties; and anniversaries.
  • Expand your sources for leads. Include your Contact & Mailing Lists.
  • Offer new Specialty Services. There is usually no competition for specialty services and no limitation on fees.
  • Always consider Public Speaking opportunities. This is especially important when you are trying to promote a new service or new specialty. Also hold seminars regarding “issues-of-the-day” in your industry. This shows clients that you are up-to-date and gives you the opportunity to nurture your friendship with their staff.
  • Entertain clients & potential clients. If a problem occurs with the services of your firm, clients are more likely to tell you and allow you to make corrections, if you and your spouse are friends. They are also more likely to give the next assignment to a “friend”.
  • Send Notes. Never forget to send Thank You Notes and look for opportunities to send notes of Congratulation. You don’t even need to know someone to recognize their achievements.
  • Open Houses and Parties. These are great ways to thank your clients, show off your celebrity clients and to tell them all about new specialties and show & tell about exciting projects.
  • Follow this tip list and see your contacts grow.

If you truly want to be perceived as “The smartest person in the room”, follow this marketing tip list and get Jack’s new book: How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room, and learn the details. You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to become a “MARKETING” genius. Visit: TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Excerpted from How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room. © 2018 John D. Gaskell. Used with permission of Professional Value Books, Inc. All rights reserved. Order at TheEngineersResource.com. Use coupon code “room” and save.

Learn how to become admired. Find out how to become the smartest person in the room. Discover how to become a marketing genius. Find out how to appear knowledgeable. Learn how to obtain training as a public speaker.

 

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GAINING CREDENTIALS

GAINING CREDENTIALS

“Learn step-by-step how gaining credentials and experience as a public speaker will help to give you a reputation as the smartest person in the room”.

By: John D. Gaskell, author of

           How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room.

You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to become a MARKETING genius.

Gaining Credentials (Part 6 of a multi-part article)

Initially, my “resume” included membership in various industry organizations. My next goal was to become a board member of RISPE. I asked the local president if there were any committee openings; there are always openings. I chose to become Publications Committee Chairman, which qualified me to attend monthly board meetings, meet the leaders, and be seen and known. Soon, I met the Nominating Committee Chairmen. After our friendship was cemented, I expressed interest in being on the board, and I became Treasurer the following year (most nominees run unopposed). That put me on the “ladder,” and I became RISPE President in four years. Gaining credentials is not as hard as it might first appear. After my presidency, I nominated one of the recent Past Presidents for the “Engineer of the Year Award”; not surprisingly, in a few years, he nominated me.

I don’t mean to imply that all this was easy; it took a lot of hard work. But, with determination and effort, you can be gaining credentials that will eventually distinguish you from your competitors. The important lesson here is: “It doesn’t just happen—you make it happen.”

Public Speaking Experience

Most professionals and leaders in business attend gatherings where their credentials are reveled. As a consulting engineer, I frequently attend “interview meetings,” where Building Committees select architects and engineers for their projects. I have watched many of my colleagues talk about their college degree, and then all that they had was a list of past projects. In addition, I could refer to the following:

I am a past President of the Rhode Island Society of Professional Engineers, the founding President of the Rhode Island Chapter of the Illuminating Engineering Society, past Director of the Electrical League of Rhode Island, and Chairman of the Electrical Code Sub-Committee of the Rhode Island Building Code Standards Committee.

I have written numerous articles for national technical publications and have been a guest speaker at the National Conference on Harmonics and Power Quality in Philadelphia.

I was honored by being selected “Engineer of the Year” by the Rhode Island Society of Professional Engineers and “Man of the Year” by the Electrical League of Rhode Island.

I am particularly proud of being a recipient of the Providence Engineering Society’s “Freeman Award.” This award was established for recognizing major achievements in engineering.

I wasn’t bragging; I was applying for a job.

If you want to be successful, don’t be afraid to build yourself up. Fortunately, your work as an officer of professional organizations will give you many opportunities to hone your skills as a public speaker. You will appreciate this because you will be required to speak before both small and large groups throughout your career.

On my first or second year in practice, I was hired to do a “light emissions” study. This was in conjunction with an environmental impact study relating to the proposed expansion of a local airport. I don’t know if I was chosen because my resume included “Member of IES” or because I was too new to properly quote a fee for such an unusual project. In any case, I visited the airport at night, under varying weather conditions, and (with a light meter) measured the light produced from the approach lights. My final conclusion was that the amount of light was less than the light emitted by a “full moon” and, therefore, had no significant impact on the environment. I submitted my report to the environmental firm that had hired me, and it was accepted.

After about 6 months, the environmental firm called me and asked me to attend a public hearing at the City Hall to answer questions, if any. I reread my report, and, with a copy, I sat down in front with the other members of our team. The remaining 500 seats were occupied by very angry neighbors, with many more standing around the perimeter of the room. The head of the environmental firm was called to the podium and, after a few introductory remarks, said: “And now I would like to call our electrical engineer, Jack Gaskell, to the podium to present the light emissions portion of our report.” I considered running for the door, but I didn’t think I could make it down the center aisle.

I rose with wobbly legs and walked to the podium with my report in hand. When the heckling from the crowd quieted down a bit, I said: “I have to start out by apologizing; it was my understanding that I was here to answer questions (if any) and, therefore, did not prepare a presentation. But I have a copy of my report and will paraphrase it for you.” I opened my report and stumbled through. When I was finished, everyone BOOED, and I took my seat. Even after all of these years, I still break out in a sweat when I think of that public hearing.

The lesson here is: Always be prepared to make a presentation.

If you truly want to be perceived as “The smartest person in the room”, get Jack’s new book: How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room, and learn the details. You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to become a MARKETING genius. Visit: TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Excerpted from How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room. © 2018 John D. Gaskell. Used with permission of Professional Value Books, Inc. All rights reserved. Order at TheEngineersResource.com. Use coupon code “room” and save.

Learn how to become admired. Find out how to become the smartest person in the room. Discover how to appear professional. Find out how to appear knowledgeable. Learn how to obtain training as a public speaker.

 

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GETTING KNOWN PROFESSIONALLY

GETTING KNOWN PROFESSIONALLY

GETTING KNOWN

“Learn step-by-step how getting known in your profession and industry will help to give you a reputation as the smartest person in the room”.

By: John D. Gaskell, author of:

           How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room.

You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to become a “MARKETING” genius.

Getting Known (Part 5 of a multi-part article)

When I graduated as an electrical engineer, I was a “nobody”; I came from a blue-collar family and had never even seen the inside of a Country Club. But I was savvy enough to realize that I needed to start building an “outstanding” reputation and more credentials.

As soon as you graduate, start attending meetings of local organizations in your field of interest. Even if you don’t have a job yet, it will give you an opportunity to meet people in your industry, contacts that might help you get a job or help you in other ways.

Here you will meet the “players” in your profession/industry, people who will be your colleges, future competitors, or future employees. In most cases, you don’t even need to join to attend meetings. Try to get on the local mailing list so that you will be notified of meetings. Most are usually evening dinner meetings with a guest speaker.

As a newly graduated engineer, I joined several organizations and attended meetings of the following:

            The Rhode Island Society of Professional Engineers (RISPE)

            Providence Engineering Society (PES)

            Electrical League of Rhode Island

            Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES)

Rhode Islanders initially had to drive 50 miles to attend meetings of the Boston IES Chapter. But we had local meetings after a group of us formed the RI Chapter of the IES, of which, I’m proud to say, I was the founding president. (Since I was only 29 and new in the business, I was very pleased that my colleagues chose me as the first president. It was not until years later that I learned that they had previously been turned down by all of my more experienced competitors).

At meetings, collect business cards from those that you want to get to know. Start making a “Contact List”, including both business and personal information. You will form a quicker and closer friendship if you can remember that he/she has an interest in baseball and has a 3-year-old daughter named Michelle.

You will find that your Contact list will be one of your most important tools in building an outstanding reputation and eventually being considered the smartest person in the room.

If you truly want to be perceived as “The smartest person in the room”, get Jack’s new book: How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room, and learn the details. You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to a MARKETING genius. Visit: TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Excerpted from How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room. © 2018 John D. Gaskell. Used with permission of Professional Value Books, Inc. All rights reserved. Order at TheEngineersResource.com. Use coupon code “room” and save.

Learn how to become admired. Find out how to become the smartest person in the room. Discover how to appear professional. Find out how to appear knowledgeable. Learn how to obtain training as a public speaker.

 

 

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GETTING EXPERIENCE

GETTING EXPERIENCE

“Learn step-by-step how to look for your first job and to prepare to impress at your interview”.

By: John D. Gaskell, author of

           How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room.

You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to become a MARKETING genius.

Getting experience (Part 4 of a multi-part article)

Once you are a graduate in your chosen field, the first step is to get a job that  you will be getting experience and to qualify you to eventually take a licensure exam, if required.

The Job Search

Depending on the job market at the time of your graduation, you may not have a wide range of job choices. But if you get a job unrelated to your goals, it is unlikely to lead to the success that you desire. You may have to consider commuting to a larger city to find work in your field.

First, prepare a “resume,” which, at this point, will only include your education and your summer job, if it involved your chosen career. But your summer job as a life guard will not impress a prospective employer. Include praiseworthy accomplishments, like being an “Eagle Scout.” Mention interests concerning your career, but certainly don’t state an interest in eventually opening your own firm/business.

Get a list of related businesses in your area. Try to find a website for each to learn a little about them.  Next, print your resume on good paper and deliver it to each business on your list, don’t mail it.

Dress for success. Men should wear a suit or sport coat and tie. A suite and bow-tie worked best for me. Women should wear a sweater and black dress pants or a blazer and skirt. Explain that you are a recent (specialty) graduate and would like to speak with the manager/president/chief engineer (Whatever applies in your case). If they ask why, reply: “I am seeking advice and will only take a few minutes.” If they say he/she is busy, reply: “That’s ok, I can wait.” If all else fails, ask the receptionist to present a copy of your resume and ask for the person’s business card. If it is a good size company, provide a second copy of your resume for the “Personnel Department.” If you don’t hear back within a week, call the person to verify that he received your resume and to inquire about job openings. Prepare a list of questions and have a copy ready for each call with spaces for the answers:

  • Did you receive my resume?
  • Are there any entry level openings?
  • Are any openings likely in the near future? If so, when?
  • Can you recommend competitors who might be hiring?
  • Do you have any advice for a young person just starting out?
  • Can I come in to your office and observe a typical day? (An eight-hour job interview)

Send a letter or e-mail thanking them for taking your call and for the advice. (Include another copy of your resume.)

If you don’t quickly get a job, stop back to see the same people. Their needs can change in just a few weeks. Consider bringing a box of chocolates, pastries or flowers for the receptionist who said that the person that you wanted to see was too busy to see you. Your goal is getting experience.

The Interview

Be prepared:

  • If you are responding to an employment posting, make a list of the skills desired so that you are prepared to discuss and relate them to your training and education. Don’t be concerned if you don’t have all the qualifications listed. There may be an entry-level position available.
  • Make a list of five skills and qualifications of yours that you can share during the interview.
  • Go to the company’s website to learn more about the company so that you will be better prepared for questions, like “What interests you about our company?”
  • Make a list of likely questions that you may be asked and prepare answers: Why should I hire you? Is there anything about the job or the company that I haven’t told you? What are your career goals in the next 5 years and how will you achieve them? What are your salary requirements?
  • Make a list of questions about the job and the company, and bring up your questions if the interviewer doesn’t offer the information.
  • Ask if you can meet someone in a similar position and the person who will be your immediate supervisor.
  • Ask about the skills that you will be learning and applying in the available position, and access their relevance to your future goals. For example, assume that you are an electrical engineer and wish to open a practice designing electrical systems for buildings. A position as a lighting designer will not teach you the diversity of other skills needed.
  • Try not to look like a “deer-in-the-headlights”; practice in front of a mirror. Listen carefully, and don’t be afraid to take notes during the interview. Bring extra copies of your resume, including a list of references. Also, bring your list of questions, a pad (in a folio), and a pen. Don’t bring a drink or chew gum, and turn your cell phone off.
  • Send the interviewer a “Thank You” note or e-mail.

You may have to widen your job search area, but, with persistence, you will eventually be getting experience in your chosen field.

If you truly want to be perceived as “The smartest person in the room”, get Jack’s new book: How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room, and learn the details. You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to become a MARKETING genius. Visit: TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Excerpted from How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room. © 2018 John D. Gaskell. Used with permission of Professional Value Books, Inc. All rights reserved. Order at TheEngineersResource.com. Use coupon code “room” and save.

Learn how to become admired. Find out how to become the smartest person in the room. Discover how to appear professional. Find out how to appear knowledgeable. Learn how to obtain training as a public speaker.

 

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OWNING A BUSINESS IS GREAT

OWNING A BUSINESS IS GREAT

OWNING A BUSINESS

“Learn the pros and cons of owning a business and make the best decision for yourself”

By: John D. Gaskell, author of

           How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room.

You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to become a “MARKETING” genius..

Do you want to own a business? (Part 3 of a multi-part article)

Advantages:

  • You have a much higher earning potential.
  • Pride of ownership.
  • Benefits of being the boss.
  • You get to make all the final decisions.
  • You can’t get laid-off.
  • You get to keep the profits.
  • You can pick and choose the most appealing tasks to personally handle and assign the others to your staff.
  • You can pursue the most interesting & profitable projects/products/clients.
  • You spend time socializing with clients and potential clients.
  • If you are successful and hire an able staff, you will have a valuable asset to sell when it comes time for your retirement.

Disadvantages:

  • Stress – There is always stress when owning a business. Some people thrive on it; others wilt. You need to decide if the benefits/advantages out way the drawbacks/disadvantages.
  • Be prepared to make “Sacrifices” – When I was new in business as a consulting engineer and still operating alone, work slowed down, and my wife and I decided to take a quick driving vacation to Canada. At the last minute, I got a call from my biggest client announcing that he had just promised a client of his to provide a redesign that had to be delivered in one week. It was no fun having to go out to the car to break the bad news to my wife and two small children.
  • You make the “Firing Decisions” – This is particularly hard during the holiday season.
  • The losses are all yours – On average, I made about three times more compensation than my fellow engineering classmates, but, during one recession, I lost more than my salary for three years in a row.
  • Employees – The biggest headache in running any business is managing human resources. Often, employees don’t get along with each other or with the clients, and, sometimes, they don’t even care about the success of the company that employs them. Regardless, before you know it, you may be responsible for thirty or more mouths to feed. That is an awesome and burdensome responsibility.

 

Making a choice

Other than a marriage choice, choosing a career and deciding on owning a business are your most important life choice. If you are still undecided I recommend that you go to the web site: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/. This is the Occupational Outlook Handbook by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.  It has a wealth of information of career choices and owning a business. First select an occupational group that interests you. Then see a list of occupations in that group including job descriptions, entry level educational requirements, as well as recent median pay levels. Next select a career choice and see details.

 

My recommendation

Only you can make this important life decision. But, I recommend the following, if you have the interest and skills:

  • Chose to be a professional: doctor, lawyer, engineer, architect, accountant, etc. When people learn that you are a “professional” they immediately assume that you are smart. You may have never gotten any grade higher than a “C”; you may have graduated last in your graduating class; and you may have had to take your licensure exam four times before passing. But, you are “perceived” to be smart, because you are a professional.

 

  • Choose a profession that will allow you to operate your own business. If you operate your own business, you will have all the advantages described above.

If you truly want to be perceived as “The smartest person in the room”, get Jack’s new book: How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room, and learn the details. You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to become a “MARKETING genius. Visit: TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Excerpted from How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room. © 2018 John D. Gaskell. Used with permission of Professional Value Books, Inc. All rights reserved. Order at TheEngineersResource.com. Use coupon code “room” and save.

 

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YOUR CAREER CHOICE

YOUR CAREER CHOICE, Lists, Contacts

YOUR CAREER CHOICE

“Learn step-by-step how to choose a career that will be lucrative enough to support you and a family, not restrict where you can live, and not require odd hours or excessive travel”.

By: John D. Gaskell, author of

           How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room.

You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to become the master of self-promotion.

 

How to make a career choice? (Part 2 of a multi-part article)

At the high school level, students should consider career options. Don’t make career choice just because it “sounds like fun.” Make sure that it will be lucrative enough to support you and a family, will not restrict where you can live, and will not require odd hours or excessive travel. I have a friend whose daughter became a Marine Biologist and later found out that it qualified her to “shovel seal poop.”

Before spending four years of your life and your parents’ hard-earned money, you should be reasonably sure that your chosen options are right for you. I recommend “shadowing” somebody in the fields that interests you. If you don’t know someone, use the internet. Make a phone call, and explain that you are a high school student interested in becoming an _________ and would like to speak to an _________. Explain to the _________ that you would like to come to his/her office and observe a typical day. Very few people would turn down that kind of a request, and it might turn into a summer internship or a job after graduation. If you are unsure of your specific career choice, call __________ of various specialties to try and gain an understanding of what their job entails. Spending time with several __________, would broaden your perceptive.

In my case, my father was an electrician. I helped him with side jobs and grew-up with an interest in electricity. I chose to take an academic vocational course in high school, Radio–Television and Industrial Electronics, with the goal of becoming a TV Repair Man. (Do you know anyone, today, who is making a living repairing TVs?) In my Senior Year of high school, two of my classmates decided to go to Wentworth Institute in Boston, MA, for an associate’s degree in Electrical Engineering; so, I applied and was accepted. When my two years at Wentworth were almost complete, a friend in my class told me that he was going to a four-year college for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering while getting almost two years of credit for his associate’s degree. So, I applied at the University of Rhode Island and was accepted, but with no credits for the two years at Wentworth. However, low in-state tuition and the ability to commute from home made this the only realistic option for me.

Instead of “stumbling” your way through six years to become an __________, plan ahead and do it in four years. In high school, take a college prep course that is strong in the subjects related to your area of interest.

When selecting a college, make sure that it is accredited in your area of specialty.

Start by making a list of benefits & drawbacks of your career choice:

Your interests/Lack of interest

Your skills/Lack of the required skills

Challenging/Easy

Varied/Repetitive

Lucrative/Adequate

Free time/Busy schedule

High/Low demand

Cyclical industry/Steady demand

Time spent inside/outside/both

Travel opportunities/Too much travel

Offers opportunity to own a business

Require immediate actions/Allows time for thoughtful decisions

Low stress/High Stress

High demand/Low demand

Puts you in an adversarial position/Not adversarial

Deadline pressure/Leisurely pace

Profitably pressure/Non-profit

Periods of too little or too much work/Steady work

Limits where you can live/No limit

High cost & time for education & internship/Low cost & time

By carefully considering these pros and cons of your career choice, you will hopefully, chose a career that will be exciting, challenging and rewarding.

If you truly want to be perceived as “The smartest person in the room”, get Jack’s new book: How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room, and learn the details. You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to be a MARKETING genius. Visit: TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Excerpted from How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room. © 2018 John D. Gaskell. Used with permission of Professional Value Books, Inc. All rights reserved. Order at TheEngineersResource.com. Use coupon code “room” and save.

 

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YOUR GREAT REPUTATION

GREAT REPUTATION

“Learn step-by-step how to impress others and be perceived to be the SMARTEST PERSON in the room”.

By: John D. Gaskell, author of

           How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room.

You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to stand-out.

Introduction (Part 1 of a multi-part article)

I am an electrical engineer and a graduate of The College of Engineering at the University of Rhode Island. With this one statement, you are likely thinking that I must be really smart. That is one of the reasons you should get the best education that is within your means.

Some of my classmates never studied and got all A’s & B’s. (I still hate those guys). I studied day & night and seldom got a grade above a C. I graduated in the bottom half of my class and it took me two tries to pass the licensing exam to become a Professional Engineer. However, I was “savvy” and within ten years many people thought that I was “The smartest person in the room”. I was really the master of “self-promotion.” If you pursue my advice, you also can be regarded as such.

If you are truly smart, you may not need my advice. But, if you are a mere mortal, you might benefit from it.

See how to plan for your career. Understand that your career must be lucrative enough to support you and a family, not restrict where you can live, and not require odd hours or excessive travel. Grasp how attending local meeting of organizations in your industry will help you to get known. Learn how to start a contact list and how to make it more than just a list of names. Realize how easy it is to become an officer of any organization and perceive the value of that credential. Comprehend how to get yourself nominated for prestigious awards that will make your resume stand out. Glean how to choose the profession or business that is right for you. Find out how to prepare your business announcement, letterhead, business cards, and brochure distinct from those of your competitors.

Realize how public speaking opportunities are free publicity. Learn why you need to start a “Notebook” to record anything that you might need again and discover why spending time each week reading about new topics in your field, business trends and current affairs will enhance your reputation. Learn what a “White Paper” is and how it will be useful in promoting your reputation as the smartest person in the room. Realize that people judge your intelligence at your first meeting. Understand why you should encourage the other person to speak and discover what a “Conversation Statement” is and why you need one.

Learn why “Memory Lists” will simplify your life and make others think that you are smart. You will find the following most useful: Joke Reminders; Trip Preparation List; Trip Packing List; Trip Last-Minute Reminders; Restaurants (Healthy Meals); Places, Times & People; and Grocery List. Understand why collecting business cards and starting a contact list will help your reputation and realize why you should expand your mailing list to include all the players in your industry. Ascertain how to select topics for your articles and how to submit them to magazines. Learn how to design, print and distribute your re-prints of your articles. Finally see why almost any kind of speaking engagement enhances your image and credibility.

If you truly want to be perceived as “The smartest person in the room”, get Jack’s new book: How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room, and learn the details. You are what you are perceived to be. Let me show you how to stand-out. Visit TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Excerpted from How to become the “SMARTEST PERSON” in the Room. © 2018 John D. Gaskell. Used with permission of Professional Value Books, Inc. All rights reserved. Order at http://www.TheEngineersResource.com. Use coupon code “room” and save.