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Gifts for ENGINEERS

Gifts for ENGINEERS

John D. Gaskell, Retired Professional Engineer, has authored three new books:

Jack’s first book is: The “Complete Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING. In essence, his readers discover “step-by-step” how to start & manage an “outstanding” Engineering Practice and exactly how to gain a reputation as an expert in their specialty. This is both a handbook for new engineers and a constant reference manual for seasoned professionals.

His second book is: The “Outline Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING. It is a condensed and abridged summery of the detailed advice provided in the “Complete Guide”. It is intended for engineers looking for just the facts; without the stories and background. It is intended to be like the “Cliff’s Notes” version of the Complete Guide.

Jack’s third book is The CONSULTING ENGINEER’S “Guidebook” and is an excerpted and extended version of the “Complete Guide”. It is the result of requests from many readers to narrow the focus to the goals of:

  • Becoming an “outstanding” consulting engineer.
  • Gaining a reputation as an “expert” in their specialty; and
  • Obtaining the engineering “management skills” needed to advance their career and make the firm stand out from their competitors.

Go to Jack’s website: TheEngineersResource.com, use coupon code “paperback” and save.

In each of these books, learn the answers to your most compelling questions about consulting engineering:

 

  • Is it the right career choice for you? Consider what this fascinating profession entails and how it will change your life.
  • Do you know how to calculate the best fee quote for each project? Learn the “insider” secrets to winning quotes that will make your projects profitable.
  • Do you want to become known in the engineering community and develop an impressive list of contacts, achievements, and awards? Learn how easy it is and how you can do it.
  • Do you want to be considered an “expert” in your specialty? If so, learn how to become a published author and how gratifying it can be to see your words in print.
  • Do you want to be part of an exceptional engineering practice? If so, you will learn how to make, both you and your firm, “outstanding.”
  • Would you like to more than “double” your firm’s selection rate for projects? Learn how to prepare the best marketing materials and implement effective marketing methods.
  • Would you like to add a “specialty” that allows you to charge one and one-half to two times your normal hourly rate? If so, consider the profitable and fascinating field of “forensic engineering.”

These books are available on Amazon.com

However, if you go to Jack’s website: TheEngineersResource.com, use coupon code “paperback” and save. Both paperback & hardcover versions are available as well as gift packages. Also, avail yourself of free chapters and free downloads, as well as other useful information and advice for Consulting Engineers.

The “Standard Gift Package” is available at: https://www.TheEngineersResource.com/shop

I have written three consulting engineering book: ‘The “Complete Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING’; The CONSULTING ENGINEER’S “Guidebook”; The “Outline Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING. They are presently on sale on Amazon. Both the paperback & hardback (Case Laminated) versions are available from my website: https://www.TheEngineersResource.com/shop

To see my YouTube video: YOUR OWN ENGINEERING PRACTICE Go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTPrwT2hZig

Related topics include:

How to Prepare for a Job Interview https://www.experisjobs.us/exp_us/en/career-advice/20-tips-job-interviews.htm

How to easily and quickly get the interviews that you want.

https://www.theengineersresource.com/your-job-interview/

Making a career choice: https://www.theengineersresource.com/making-a-career-choice/

Contacts & Mailing Lists: https://www.theengineersresource.com/contacts-mailing-lists/

How to become known, build a reputation and make useful contacts.

https://www.theengineersresource.com/your-job-interview/

Become Exceptional: https://www.theengineersresource.com/become-exceptional/

Making a Career Choice: https://www.theengineersresource.com/making-a-career-choice/

“White Papers” – Help You Learn: https://www.theengineersresource.com/white-papers-help-learn/

Publish Magazine Articles: https://www.theengineersresource.com/white-papers-help-learn/

Excerpted

Excerpted from ‘The “Complete Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING’  © by John D. Gaskell, Retired Professional Engineer. All rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to copy and distribute this “Consulting Engineering” tip, upon condition that this message remains.

Visit: https://www.TheEngineersResource.com for additional tips.

 

 

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YOUR OWN ENGINEERING PRACTICE

Engineering Gifts, Gift Ideas for Engineers, Engineer Gift Ideas, Awesome Gifts for Engineers, Gift Engineering Practice, Graduation Gifts for engineers, Gifts for Engineers, Top gifts for Engineers, Gifts for graduating Engineers, Gift ideas for Engineering students, 3 Best Gifts for Engineers, Gifts for electrical engineers

YOUR OWN ENGINEERING PRACTICE WITHIN 6 YEARS OF GRADUATION

Surprisingly this is a realistic goal. Find out the step-by-step roadmap at TheEngineersResource.com. When I graduated with a BS in engineering, I was a no-body. I had no connections and had never seen the inside of a country club. But, I was savvy enough to know that I needed to make contacts and get known. I had my own full time private practice in less than 5 years.

The secrets are revealed in the new book The “Complete Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING by John D. Gaskell, Retired Professional Engineer. Go to TheEngineersResource.com to learn more about consulting engineering and to download a free chapter.

The ideal gift for engineers of all disciplines is The “Deluxe” Gift Package which is all three of my books in Hard Cover (Casewraped) or The “Standard” Gift Package in Paperback. Would you like to be responsible for providing an engineering practice for your engineer that will support him/her and their family for their entire career? What are you waiting for?

Learn the answers to your most compelling questions about consulting engineering:

  • Is it the right career choice for you? Consider what this fascinating profession entails and how it will change your life.
  • Do you want to have your own engineering firm? If so, you will learn the step-by-step procedures to make it happen.
  • Would you like to be able to predict your first year’s income and expenses? You will discover how to prepare a Business Plan.
  • Do you know how to calculate the best fee quote for each project? Learn the “insider” secrets to winning quotes that will make your projects profitable.
  • Do you want to become known in the engineering community and develop an impressive list of contacts, achievements, and awards? Learn how easy it is and how you can do it.
  • Do you want to be considered an “expert” in your specialty? If so, learn how to become a published author and how gratifying it can be to see your words in print.
  • Do you want to be part of an exceptional engineering practice? If so, you will learn how to make, both you and your firm, “outstanding.”
  • Would you like to more than “double” your firm’s selection rate for projects? Learn how to prepare the best marketing materials and implement effective marketing methods.
  • Would you like to add a “specialty” that allows you to charge one and one-half to two times your normal hourly rate. If so, consider the profitable and fascinating field of “forensic engineering.”

Go to TheEngineersResource.com to learn more about consulting engineering and to download a free chapter.

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TOP MARKETING IDEAS

https://www.theengineersresource.com/finest-sales-marketing-book/

 

 

 

Learn how to market both yourself and your company – Be exceptional and Succeed.

‘The “Smart Guide” to MARKETING’ by Jack Gaskell is a #1 New Release. It is a handbook to achieving a reputation of brilliance and reveals the easiest way for you to succeed in any profession or business. Learn what is common to all enterprises, such as: building your reputation, finding and keeping clients/customers, promoting new work/projects, distinguishing yourself with achievements and awards, being selected over your competition, and managing your practice/business profitably.Be exceptional and Succeed.

  • Be exceptional: There is no point in striving for a great reputation if you can’t produce exceptional services/products. Be exceptional and Succeed.
  • Get known: Attend meetings of local industry organizations.
  • Start a contact list: including both business and personal information. Include anyone who might use your services/products or recommend you.
  • Become an officer: Volunteer for committees and after you become accepted, let it be known that you want to be an officer.
  • Win awards: After you have been active in an organization, nominate another involved member for an award and they will later return the favor. Or have a mutual friend suggest it.
  • Start saving: You’ll need equity, good credit, and banking relations to start a business.
  • It doesn’t just happen. You make it happen. Be exceptional and Succeed.
  • Business announcement. Make your business announcement outstanding. It should look like a wedding invitation on fine thick paper with raised letters.
  • Letterhead and business cards. Create elegant letterhead and business cards. Parchment with raised letters would be a good choice.
  • Your brochure is the face of the company. It will evolve as your firm grows. Try to make it versatile and something that will make you proud and distinguish you from your competitors.
  • Don’t forget to send out announcements of awards, new services/specialties, and anniversaries.
  • Always consider public speaking as an opportunity. By becoming an officer of one or more of your industry organizations you will progressively gain more and more public speaking training, so when you become the organization’s president you will be an accomplished public speaker.
  • Send notes. Never forget to send thank you notes, and look for opportunities to send notes of congratulations. You don’t even need to know someone to recognize their achievements.
  • Your notebook: to record information, such as office procedures, your contact list, formulas, calculations, definitions, and anything that you might need again. Your lap-top will be your notebook.
  • Spend time: Reading magazines in your industry, plus articles regarding business trends, and current affairs.
  • Success: Includes: happiness, wealth, respect, good health, family and friends, interests, and charity. The starting point of success is happiness and not wealth. But wealth should not be overlooked. Make a prioritized list of your own ideas of the components of success and develop a plan to accomplish your goals.
  • White paper: A white paper is a report or guide to help readers to understand an issue. After you have prepared a white paper, reread it several times, and commit much of the information to memory. They will serve as a useful future reference and possibly the basis of a magazine article authored by you.
  • Collect business cards: Start a contact list, including both business and personal information. Create a form for each person on your contact list. Each time that you contact the person, list the date and details on this sheet.
  • Articles: Try to publish at least one article per year in the most prominent magazine in your industry. Being a published author is the quickest and most effective way to boost your reputation. Write about your projects or clients or timely issues in your industry.
  • Designing, printing, and distributing reprints of your articles is one of the keys to being successful.
  • Public speaking: Almost any kind of speaking engagement enhances your image and credibility.

Excerpted

Excerpted from ‘The “Smart Guide” to MARKETING’ Copyright © 2020 by Jack Gaskell. All rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to copy and distribute this “Smart Guide” tip, upon condition that this message remains. Visit: https://www.TheEngineersResource.com for additional tips. Be exceptional and Succeed.

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STANDARD OF CARE EXPERT TESTIMONY

STANDARD OF CARE EXPERT TESTIMONY

“Learn how to be a standard of care engineering expert witness”

By John D. Gaskell, Retired Consulting Engineer

Author of “The Complete Guide to FORENSIC ENGINEERING

Forensic engineering is defined by the National Academy of Forensic Engineers (NAFE) as “the application of the art and science of engineering in matters which are in, or may possibly relate to, the jurisprudence system, inclusive of alternative dispute resolution.” These engineers serve as consultants to the legal profession and as expert witnesses in courts of law.

Acceptance of Cases

Accept only cases in your field of expertise, but don’t necessarily limit them to your area of specialty. My cases as an electrical engineer included electrocutions, fires of suspected electrical origin, standard of care determinations, equipment failures, arc fault accidents, conveyor accidents, lightning strikes, and others. Yours will be different but also interesting and challenging.

General

The following is a narrative synopses of one of my cases. This is not intended to be a formal presentation of legal actions. No confidential or privileged information is revealed. This is simply my recollection, intended only to illustrate an expert’s typical involvement in judicial matters.

I was the chief investigator and expert witness on all of the forensic cases of Gaskell Associates, Ltd., and later those of the Gaskell Associates division of Thielsch Engineering, until my retirement. However, it was my practice to meet on each case with my senior staff to “brainstorm” the case. This often opened up avenues of investigation that had not previously occurred to me. I attribute much of my success to hiring others who are smarter than I am.

Case Study – Standard of Care

My largest forensic case involved the Denver International Airport. This was one of the largest construction projects in the United States for three years in a row and employed more than 10,000 workmen simultaneously. (I was not involved with the famous “Baggage Handling System” problems that delayed the opening of the airport for almost a year.) Because of what seemed to be an inordinate number of errors and omissions by the main terminal architects and engineers, the city and county of Denver decided to sue. Architects and engineers are not expected to be perfect and are not required to compensate owners for their mistakes, if these professionals meet the standard of care—“that level or quality of service ordinarily provided by other normally competent practitioners of good standing in that field, contemporaneously providing similar services in the same locality and under the same circumstances.”

When my friends ask how I was selected to investigate the electrical issues, I tell them that they did a nationwide search and picked me. In fact, a mechanical engineer friend of mine met the litigation manager at a seminar and was asked to put together a New England team. I was told that they wanted to avoid anyone who might know the Denver architects and engineers.

I made six trips to Denver and reviewed files of 143 alleged electrical errors and omissions. I was deposed (oral questioning by the opposing attorney) for six hours and appeared on the witness stand for four hours. Unfortunately, there is no formula to apply regarding standard of care. I needed to evaluate the facts and circumstances and express my professional opinion.

The residents of Denver had endured the presence of rowdy construction workers for ten years and were anxious to get vengeance with a lawsuit. But by the time that the trial actually took place, they had all used the airport, enjoyed the wide concourses, and took pride in the many design awards that the airport received. Their verdict was “not guilty.” An unofficial poll later revealed that the jurors’ general feeling was “yes, they made a lot of mistakes, but it was a complicated and unique design and anyone would have made slipups.”

Litigation consulting is interesting, challenging, and profitable. If what is involved interests you, I recommend adding “Forensic Engineering” to your practice as a consulting engineer.

Get Jack’s new book: The “Complete Guide” to FORENSIC ENGINEERING to learn the details. Also, the largest chapter in his book: The “Complete Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING covers the “highlights” of Forensic Engineering. Visit TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Learn how to be a forensic engineer. Learn how to be a forensic expert witness. How to be an engineering expert witness. How to obtain training as a forensic engineer. How to obtain training as an engineering expert witness.

 

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SMARTPHONE FIRE INVESTIGATION

SMARTPHONE FIRE INVESTIGATION

“Learn the step-by-step process of doing a smartphone fire investigation as an engineering expert”

By John D. Gaskell, Retired Consulting Engineer

Author of “The Complete Guide to FORENSIC ENGINEERING

Forensic engineering is defined by the National Academy of Forensic Engineers (NAFE) as “the application of the art and science of engineering in matters which are in, or may possibly relate to, the jurisprudence system, inclusive of alternative dispute resolution.” These engineers serve as consultants to the legal profession and as expert witnesses in courts of law.

Acceptance of Cases

Accept only cases in your field of expertise, but don’t necessarily limit them to your area of specialty. My cases as an electrical engineer included electrocutions, fires of suspected electrical origin, standard of care determinations, equipment failures, arc fault accidents, conveyor accidents, lightning strikes, and others. Yours will be different but also interesting and challenging.

General

The following is a narrative synopses of one of my cases. This is not intended to be a formal presentation of legal actions. No confidential or privileged information is revealed. This is simply my recollection, intended only to illustrate an expert’s typical involvement in judicial matters.

I was the chief investigator and expert witness on all of the forensic cases of Gaskell Associates, Ltd., and later those of the Gaskell Associates division of Thielsch Engineering, until my retirement. However, it was my practice to meet on each case with my senior staff to “brainstorm” the case. This often opened up avenues of investigation that had not previously occurred to me. I attribute much of my success to hiring others who are smarter than I am.

Case Study – Smartphone Fire

A home was severely damaged by fire allegedly caused when a smartphone was left unattended while charging. The fire marshal and the other fire investigators had identified the origin of the fire to be in the vicinity of the phone. We were hired for the defense by the attorney of the manufacturer of the phone charger. As usual, we read through a lengthy smartphone fire case file, did some research, examined the evidence and an exemplar (new sample of the same item), and visited the scene. We couldn’t find any defect, but we agreed with the information in the case file that the charger seemed to be the only item associated with the origin of the fire with enough energy to start the fire.

Then, somewhat by luck, we came across a news article about lithium-ion batteries catching on fire. We checked the specifications of the phone in question, and, sure enough, it had a lithium-ion battery. These batteries were becoming popular because of their high-density capacity (watt-hours/kilogram). A problem can occur if there is a failure of the thin separators that keep the elements of the battery apart. This can trigger what is known as “thermal runaway,” causing the battery to overheat and burst into flames. Two things that keep today’s lithium-ion batteries relatively safe are improvements in manufacturing techniques and the use of smarter monitoring systems. We also found an article about how these batteries can be damaged by using them in hot environments, causing rapid charging. Two of the depositions indicated that the phone was in front of the window on a carpet in direct sunlight.

Armed with this information, our attorney/client told us to stop all work on the smartphone fire case and to submit our final bill. The lessons here are keep abreast of the news related to your cases and find something else at which to point a finger.

Litigation consulting is interesting, challenging, and profitable. If what is involved interests you, I recommend adding “Forensic Engineering” to your practice as a consulting engineer.

Get Jack’s new book: The “Complete Guide” to FORENSIC ENGINEERING to learn the details. Also, the largest chapter in his book: The “Complete Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING covers the “highlights” of Forensic Engineering. Visit TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Learn how to be a forensic engineer. Learn how to be a forensic expert witness. How to be an engineering expert witness. How to obtain training as a forensic engineer. How to obtain training as an engineering expert witness.

 

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LIGHTNING INJURY INVESTIGATION

LIGHTNING INJURY INVESTIGATION

“Learn the step-by-step process of doing a lightning injury investigation as an engineering expert”

By John D. Gaskell, Retired Consulting Engineer

Author of “The Complete Guide to FORENSIC ENGINEERING

Lightning Injury Investigation

Learn the step-by-step process of doing a lightning injury investigation as an engineering expert. Forensic engineering is defined by the National Academy of Forensic Engineers (NAFE) as “the application of the art and science of engineering in matters which are in, or may possibly relate to, the jurisprudence system, inclusive of alternative dispute resolution.” These engineers serve as consultants to the legal profession and as expert witnesses in courts of law.

Acceptance of Cases

Accept only cases in your field of expertise, but don’t necessarily limit them to your area of specialty. My cases as an electrical engineer included electrocutions, fires of suspected electrical origin, standard of care determinations, equipment failures, arc fault accidents, conveyor accidents, lightning strikes, and others. Yours will be different but also interesting and challenging.

General

The following is a narrative synopses of one of my cases. This is not intended to be a formal presentation of legal actions. No confidential or privileged information is revealed. This is simply my recollection, intended only to illustrate an expert’s typical involvement in judicial matters.

I was the chief investigator and expert witness on all of the forensic cases of Gaskell Associates, Ltd., and later those of the Gaskell Associates division of Thielsch Engineering, until my retirement. However, it was my practice to meet on each case with my senior staff to “brainstorm” the case. This often opened up avenues of investigation that had not previously occurred to me. I attribute much of my success to hiring others who are smarter than I am.

Lightning Injury Investigation

My first “forensic” case involved injury by lightning. It was so long ago that I don’t remember if the event was fatal or not. An employee at a factory was told that it was raining and her car windows were open. She borrowed an umbrella and walked to her car. At some point, she was struck by lightning. I wasn’t called in until more than a year later, when the case was about to go to court. My job was to visit the site and measure distances from the point of the incident to structures (fence, poles, and buildings) and associated heights. I examined what was left of the umbrella, reviewed the weather report for the day, and studied lightning theory. Eventually, I testified as an expert witness for the plaintiff at trial regarding what occurred. I didn’t know enough to charge more than my usual hourly rate, but I was impressed that I could get paid to study an interesting topic like lightning.

Litigation consulting is interesting, challenging, and profitable. If what is involved interests you, I recommend adding “Forensic Engineering” to your practice as a consulting engineer.

Get Jack’s new book: The “Complete Guide” to FORENSIC ENGINEERING to learn the details. Also, the largest chapter in his book: The “Complete Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING covers the “highlights” of Forensic Engineering. Visit TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Learn how to be a forensic engineer. Learn how to be a forensic expert witness. How to be an engineering expert witness. How to obtain training as a forensic engineer. How to obtain training as an engineering expert witness.

 

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The “Complete Guide” to FORENSIC ENGINEERING

START FORENSIC ENGINEERING

The “Complete Guide” to FORENSIC ENGINEERING

 “Learn the step-by-step process of preparing your forensic engineering case that will make your testimony creditable.”

By John D. Gaskell, Retired Consulting Engineer

Author of “The Complete Guide to FORENSIC ENGINEERING

Forensic engineering is defined by the National Academy of Forensic Engineers (NAFE) as “the application of the art and science of engineering in matters which are in, or may possibly relate to, the jurisprudence system, inclusive of alternative dispute resolution.” These engineers serve as consultants to the legal profession and as expert witnesses in courts of law.

In essence, readers discover “step-by-step” how to start & manage an “outstanding” Forensic Engineering Practice and exactly how to gain a reputation as an expert in their specialty.

This is both a handbook for new experts and a constant reference manual for seasoned professionals.

The book is divided into “five parts”: Preparation; Planning; Implementation; Managing; and Cashing Out.
PREPARATION includes:
• Selecting an engineering collage. Make sure that it has the right accreditation to allow you take the Professional Engineering license exam. (ABET-EAC accredited)
• Take the FE exam. In your senior year at college, while the fundamentals of engineering are still fresh in your mind.
• Gain experience. A minimum of four (4) years of “certifiable” experience in engineering work is required for a PE license. Work in a forensic engineering/expert witness practice would be best. However, this could be postponed until after you have a license.
• Join engineering societies. Become an officer; make contacts; gain credentials; and build a reputation.
PLANNING includes:
• Recognize opportunities. Buying an existing practice; starting upon another expert’s retirement; becoming a partner in an existing firm; or hanging out your shingle.
• Consider ownership options. Carefully consider the pros & cons of being on your own verses having partners.
• Choose Specialties. Choosing between being a “single-discipline” or “multi-discipline” firm.
• Prepare a Business Plan. Learn how to write a “Business Plan” including how to estimate expenses & income for both start-up and your first year.
• Apply for a Business Loan. Discover the secrets to getting approved for a Business Loan
IMPLEMENTATION includes:
• Pre Start-up “Check List”. Once you have made the GO decision, find out the initial steps to take & things to avoid.
• Start-up “Check List”. Discover how to actually start your practice step-by-step.
MANAGING includes:
• Acquiring service. Learn how to select the right Attorney & CPA and obtain the insurance coverage needed.
• Marketing. Discover the marketing materials & methods that will keep your firm busy.
• Expert. Learn the secret of gaining a reputation as an “expert” by publishing technical articles.
• Fees. Learn how to craft your Forensic Fee Agreement and learn how to get paid in advance by “retainer”.
CASHING OUT includes:
• Selling your firm. Learn how to sell your practice for the maximum profit and retire comfortably.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART 1  PREPARATION

Chapter 1 – BECOMING A PROFFESIONAL ENGINEER

Chapter 2 – PREPARING FOR YOUR OWN FIRM

PART 2  PLANNING

Chapter 3 – START-UP OPTIONS & SPACE PLANNING

Chapter 4 – FINANCIAL FORECASTING

Chapter 5 – FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

Chapter 6 – BUSINESS PLAN

PART 3  IMPLEMENTATION

Chapter 7 – CASTING OFF

PART 4  MANAGING YOUR FIRM

Chapter 8 – LEGAL, ACCOUNTING & INSURANCE

Chapter 9 – MARKETING MATERIALS

Chapter 10 – MARKETING METHODS

Chapter 11 – FEE PROPOSALS

Chapter 12 – OPERATIONS MANUAL

Chapter 13 – HUMAN RESOURCES

PART 5 – CASHING OUT

Chapter 14 – SELLING YOUR PRACTICE

 

Specifications:

7″ x 10″ (17.78 x 25.4 cm)

Paperback or

Hardcover (Casewraped)
Black & White Bleed on White paper
316 pages

Litigation consulting is interesting, challenging, and profitable. If what is involved interests you, I recommend adding “Forensic Engineering” to your practice as a consulting engineer.

Get Jack’s new book: The “Complete Guide” to FORENSIC ENGINEERING to learn the details. Also, the largest chapter in his book: The “Complete Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING covers the “highlights” of Forensic Engineering. Visit TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Learn how to be a forensic engineer. Learn how to be a forensic expert witness. How to be an engineering expert witness. How to obtain training as a forensic engineer. How to obtain training as an engineering expert witness.

 

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EXPERT TRIAL TESTIMONY

EXPERT TRIAL TESTIMONY

“Learn the step-by-step process that will make your expert trial testimony creditable as an engineering expert witness.”

By John D. Gaskell, Retired Consulting Engineer

Author of “The Complete Guide to FORENSIC ENGINEERING”

Forensic engineering is defined by the National Academy of Forensic Engineers (NAFE) as “the application of the art and science of engineering in matters which are in, or may possibly relate to, the jurisprudence system, inclusive of alternative dispute resolution.” These engineers serve as consultants to the legal profession and as expert witnesses in courts of law.

On the day of court, arrive early and well rested. Men should wear a suit or conservative jacket and tie. A dark pinstriped suit, bow tie, and pocket square worked for me; it might not be best for you. Most women look impressive in a dark-colored suit, neutral blouse, and medium-heeled pumps. Don’t show up in casual or sporty clothes for your expert trial testimony.

Don’t let the unexpected throw you off of your game. Try to picture in your mind, ahead of time, whom and what you may see in court. If someone was terribly disfigured in a fire, be prepared for the encounter. If someone injured his right hand in the accident, be prepared for him to offer his left hand for a handshake.

As you approach the witness stand, give a copy of your business card to the court reporter. He or she will spell your name correctly, and the jury will believe this is not your first testimony.

While on the stand, sit up straight and lean slightly forward to give the appearance of full attention. Respond confidently to each question, and address your reply to the jury, looking directly at them. Your attorney/client will do your direct examination, and the first questions will be to qualify you as an expert witness and to make your expert trial testimony credible. Beforehand, discuss with your attorney/client regarding the depth that he desires, and be prepared to recite your qualifications from memory. Oftentimes, if your qualifications are eminent, the opposing attorney will “stipulate” to your qualifications: accept you as an expert without enumeration. Sometimes, my attorney/client objected to stipulation; he wanted the jury to hear my qualifications. Appear calm at all times, and try not to let the opposing attorney get you visibly upset.

Remember that you should not express opinions on matters beyond your expertise. Respond as follows: “I am not qualified as an expert in that area of knowledge.” If your answer to a question is “I don’t know,” and the opposing attorney presses you further, look at the judge and state, “I don’t want to guess.”

Regardless of how you think your expert trial testimony went, leave the stand walking erect with your head held high and a neutral expression on your face.

Litigation consulting is interesting, challenging, and profitable. If expert trial testimony interests you, I recommend adding “Forensic Engineering” to your practice as a consulting engineer.

Get Jack’s new book: The “Complete Guide” to FORENSIC ENGINEERING to learn the details. Also, the largest chapter in his book: The “Complete Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING covers the “highlights” of Forensic Engineering. Visit TheEngineersResource.com to find out more.

Learn how to be a forensic engineer. Learn how to be a forensic expert witness. How to be an engineering expert witness. How to obtain training as a forensic engineer. How to obtain training as an engineering expert witness.

 

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AWESOME GRADUATION GIFT FOR ENGINEERS

Engineering Gifts, Gift Ideas for Engineers, Engineer Gift Ideas, Awesome Gifts for Engineers, Gift Engineering Practice, Graduation Gifts for engineers, Gifts for Engineers, Top gifts for Engineers, Gifts for graduating Engineers, Gift ideas for Engineering students, 3 Best Gifts for Engineers, Gifts for electrical engineers, Gifts-for-Mechanical –engineers

YOUR OWN ENGINEERING PRACTICE WITHIN 6 YEARS OF GRADUATION

Surprisingly this is a realistic goal. Find out the step-by-step roadmap at TheEngineersResource.com. When I graduated with a BS in engineering, I was a no-body. I had no connections and had never seen the inside of a country club. But, I was savvy enough to know that I needed to make contacts and get known. I had my own full time private practice in less than 5 years.

The secrets are revealed in the new book The “Complete Guide” to CONSULTING ENGINEERING by John D. Gaskell, Retired Professional Engineer. Go to TheEngineersResource.com to learn more about consulting engineering and to download a free chapter.

The ideal gift for engineers of all disciplines is The “Deluxe” Gift Package which is all three of my books in Hard Cover (Case bound) or The “Standard” Gift Package in Paperback. Would you like to be responsible for providing an engineering practice for your engineer that will support him/her and their family for their entire career? What are you waiting for?

Learn the answers to your most compelling questions about consulting engineering:

  • Is it the right career choice for you? Consider what this fascinating profession entails and how it will change your life.
  • Do you want to have your own engineering firm? If so, you will learn the step-by-step procedures to make it happen.
  • Would you like to be able to predict your first year’s income and expenses? You will discover how to prepare a Business Plan.
  • Do you know how to calculate the best fee quote for each project? Learn the “insider” secrets to winning quotes that will make your projects profitable.
  • Do you want to become known in the engineering community and develop an impressive list of contacts, achievements, and awards? Learn how easy it is and how you can do it.
  • Do you want to be considered an “expert” in your specialty? If so, learn how to become a published author and how gratifying it can be to see your words in print.
  • Do you want to be part of an exceptional engineering practice? If so, you will learn how to make, both you and your firm, “outstanding.”
  • Would you like to more than “double” your firm’s selection rate for projects? Learn how to prepare the best marketing materials and implement effective marketing methods.
  • Would you like to add a “specialty” that allows you to charge one and one-half to two times your normal hourly rate. If so, consider the profitable and fascinating field of “forensic engineering.”

Go to TheEngineersResource.com to learn more about consulting engineering and to download a free chapter.

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YOUR OWN ENGINEERING PRACTICE WITHIN 6 YEARS OF GRADUATION

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YOUR OWN ENGINEERING PRACTICE WITHIN 6 YEARS OF GRADUATION

Continue reading YOUR OWN ENGINEERING PRACTICE WITHIN 6 YEARS OF GRADUATION